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Ten of Romney’s foreign policy failures

Two hundred and ninety-one days after his last foreign policy speech, Mitt Romney stood up once more to deliver a major foreign policy plan and—once again—failed to offer any new or even credible policy ideas.

Romney has long displayed a significant lack of knowledge and experience over the years when it comes to foreign policy. But the commander-in-chief only has one chance to make the right decision. Here’s a look at ten times Romney and his campaign got it wrong:

  1. Romney “has been especially vague about how many U.S. forces he would keep in Afghanistan” and has no detailed plan for our engagement in the country.

  2. Romney’s campaign said “real Americans” don’t care what Romney’s Afghanistan policy is.

  3. Before Osama bin Laden’s death, Romney said he wouldn’t go into Pakistan if we had bin Laden in our sights and that it was “not worth moving heaven and earth” to find bin Laden.

  4. Romney pledged “to do the opposite” of what President Obama has done for Israel, which includes record-level security funding.

  5. Romney called Russia, a strategic partner of the United States on vital issues, America’s “number one geopolitical foe.”

  6. When asked how he’d approach going to war with Iran, Romney has said he’d defer to his lawyers: “You sit down with your attorneys” so they can “tell you what you have to do.”

  7. Romney has said that bringing all our troops home from Iraq was “tragic” and that it was a “naked political calculation.”

  8. Romney “fled down a hallway and escaped up an escalator” to avoid answering a reporter about his position on the NATO mission in Libya.

  9. Romney called the fading power of Venezuela’s leader Hugo Chavez a serious threat to our national security.

  10. Romney’s campaign said President Obama was not doing enough to protect Czechoslovakia—a country that no longer exists—from “the Soviets.”