Increasing access & affordability

The new law is making health care work better for all of us, even if you already have insurance. It puts the health of your family first—ensuring access to free preventive care and protecting consumers from insurance company abuses.

32 million Americans will have access to affordable health coverage thanks to President Obama's health care law.

Women's Health

Before the Affordable Care Act

Insurance companies routinely charged women up to 50 percent more than men for the same plan, while some plans completely excluded coverage for maternity care.

Today

Insurance companies are offering women the preventive care they need, like prenatal screenings, mammograms, and colonoscopies, free of charge—and soon, well-woman visits, HPV testing, and contraception will be available without a co-pay or deductible.

By 2014

Women can no longer be charged more than a man for the same coverage, and plans will cover the full range of maternity benefits.

25 & Under

Before the Affordable Care Act

Insurance companies used to be able to drop kids from their parents’ insurance plans at 18 or at graduation.

Today

3.1 million young people who would otherwise be uninsured have been able to stay on their parents' health insurance plans until age 26—helping them continue to have access to health care as they start their careers and making sure those with pre-existing conditions don't lose their coverage. And insurance companies can no longer deny coverage to any person under 19 due to a pre-existing condition.

Preventive care

Before the Affordable Care Act

Insurance companies are offering more preventive services free of charge, helping catch illnesses early and reducing long-run health care costs.

Today

If you already have insurance, the law's individual responsibility requirement won't change your coverage. When fully implemented, this common-sense reform will help make sure all families have the coverage they need with:

  • Checkups and well-woman visits
  • Cholesterol and blood pressure checks
  • Mammograms and colon cancer screenings
  • Flu shots and childhood vaccines
  • Contraception
  • Prenatal screenings and support to breastfeeding mothers

Individual responsibility

Before the Affordable Care Act

When individuals who can afford to buy insurance choose not to, they shift their health care costs to all of us. Today, families with insurance pay a hidden tax of nearly $1,000 per year to cover health care for the uninsured. 

By 2014

If you already have insurance, the law’s individual responsibility requirement won’t change your coverage. When fully implemented, this common-sense reform will help make sure all families have the coverage they need with:

  • New tax credits: To help middle-class families buy a plan in new state marketplaces for affordable insurance, putting coverage within reach of nearly every American
  • Individual responsibility: Only 1 percent of all Americans, those who can afford coverage but choose not to purchase it, are expected to owe a fine—which offsets the medical costs they are passing on to others. People who get insurance through their employer, through Medicare, or who cannot afford insurance are exempt from the rule.
  • Lower costs: Making coverage more affordable for the vast majority of Americans who already have insurance